Issey Miyake

Resort 2019

 

For the creative head of a brand devoted to innovation and technology, Issey Miyake designer Yoshiyuki Miyamae is particularly obsessed with nature. There’s a pleasing irony in that, and it enlivened his Resort collection’s standout pieces: a pleated dress and separates hand-painted by the studio in desert hues lifted from Georgia O’Keeffe’s landscapes. O’Keeffe is much-referenced these days—chalk that up to a recent Brooklyn Museum exhibition celebrating her iconic art and her inspiring lifestyle and fashion sense—but Miyamae’s interpretation stands apart from others. Miyake has as strong a signature as O’Keeffe did.

The petal idea extended to solid pieces made using the house’s steam stretch technique, which creates pleats by using thread that shrinks when heated. The hems of tops, skirts, and dresses bloomed rather dramatically like tulips. Elsewhere, the focus was on relaxing the trademarks, including by serving up some denim separates. Issey “jeans” have absolutely nothing to do with the no-stretch, dark-rinse selvedge jeans that are trending in the market now. Miyamae chose the lightest-weight denim around, and rather than pleating it, he added surface interest by color-blocking it with black.

Courtesy of vogue.com

 

Available in Jade Plaza Indonesia

Issey Miyake

Pre-Fall 2018

 

Issey Miyake creative director Yoshiyuki Miyamae has been looking at the natural world for inspiration of late. Pre-Fall is no exception. This season it was our sun itself that inspired him, but the results here were less literal and more graphic than at his recent runway collection—a positive development. There were no photo prints, for example, but there were orderly, curving rows of polka dots on a group of pieces made with the label’s proprietary baked stretch technique.  Miyamae’s approach is methodical; he’s as much a lab scientist as he is a designer. Take those arabesques of dots. Up until now, the company could only achieve straight pleats via baked stretch. Now they do curves. It’s a subtle difference to be sure, but subtlety has its rewards. A case in point was a very fine blazer made from a cotton thread woven in a Japanese Sashiko technique that was then steam pleated. With its frayed edges, it evoked tweed, but it remains remarkably light, making it ideal for travel. All of Miyamae’s stuff is genius for packing, including the season’s new top-handle leather bag, which deconstructs completely flat. Courtesy of vogue.com

 

Available in Jade Plaza Indonesia

Issey Miyake

Spring Summer 2018

 

Miyake’s aesthetic in womenswear might be a little banal—the menswear is far sharper—but even when infuriated, you cannot fault their dedication to innovation in fabrication. Three dancers came out and contorted, stretching their raiments of a dark fabric interjected with pale angled vents that yielded with the pressure and consequently became lighter in color with the stretching. Then a proper, tall model appeared in an asymmetrical poncho of the same fabric over tricksily pleated wide black pants. The show that ensued was notable for the diversity of age in its casting and a bouncing elastic cloak/dress worn barefoot by a serene-looking model—it was printed with a bird’s-eye view of what looked to be the North Pole. We were at the top of the world looking down, in technologically advanced fabrics that reflected the mountainscapes and rust- or kelp-like colorways of Iceland, where team Miyake had been on a research trip.

 

Available in Jade Plaza Indonesia